If you insist on using social proof, I highly recommend you to use more quirky numbers. It is more powerful saying ‘Join 4,693 other ecommerce fans. Get your tips now.’ It seems like the number is the exact number of subscribers and will seem more accurate.
If you sign up for something and the terms include words like “Sign up to receive updates from us and our partners that we think you’ll like,” your email address is likely being collected for a shared or sold list. A subset of this method is called co-registration. This is where you sign up at a website, but that website also automatically, or nearly automatically, signs you up for other sites. They try to legitimize this by informing you of the additional subscriptions, or providing boxes to uncheck. This is a situation where it’s not the subscriber’s intention to sign up for the material they will be receiving.
Certain things go better together. Wine and cheese. Beer and tacos. And you can definitely throw direct marketing and digital marketing into that mix. If your marketing campaign is stuck, consider adding some digital spice to the concoction. You can do this in a number of proven ways and through myriad channels: social media, email and even offline campaigns with digital components, such as PURLs and video cards.
Unfortunately, there are individuals off in who-knows-where selling worthless databases containing hundreds of thousands of outdated contacts for next to nothing. Not only is this shady and immoral, but it is creating a blanketing negative stereotype of the data industry.
Your blog provides a great way to build a personal relationship with customers and prospects — and to gather their email addresses. Consistently end blogs with a call to action that encourages readers to sign up for your email messages. Require blog visitors to provide an email list in order to leave comments, and set it up so that they have to actively opt out if they don’t want their email address included on your mailing list.
VALUE OF TIME: $99 for 100,000 email addresses. Sure, some email lists are so cheap that there is not much money risk in trying. However, the time and hassle in dealing with a low quality email list can add up a lot of dollars. There’s also the risk of your getting your IP address blacklisted for using a low quality email list. In addition, there is the potential risk/harm to your brand / company name.
I have used several versions of EasyMail and recently upgraded my version to 7.0 and we bought several copies for the company I work for as well. The cost is very reasonable and the tech support is prompt. Updates arrive frequently.
People give their consent to get your mailings. Your website visitors are your potential recipients. They come to your site, and they like it, and they want to get more information about your products, services, or any other information you can provide.
Ask that the email list includes the “full contact name” of the email recipient … and the “direct mail address.” Proceed with caution when an email list is missing this key data. Also, be sure the direct mail addresses have a 94+ percent delivery guarantee … or money refund. Having the full name of email recipient will let you know if you’re receiving multiple emails addresses for the same person. And the direct mail address will let you know if you’re receiving 5 email addresses for the same household … which could raise a flag if you’re were seeking just the adult male parent … not all the children. Without the “full name” of email recipient and direct mail address, you’re simply shooting in the dark … absolutely no idea about the names on the email list that you just purchased.
Your email list is your best friend when you work with email marketing. The ideal email list contains plenty of relevant subscribers, who have all willingly given you their email address because you have promised them valuable content in return.
If you went out to eat, and you gave your email address to the restaurant, and then the restaurant went out of business… would you want to start getting emails from the old restaurant owner about his new carpet cleaning business? I suspect not.
All you need is to add an opt-in form within your content. This can be done by embedding a form from your email provider or you can use one of the plugins listed above which support shortcode placement.
Excellent post as always Brian. You mentioned a downloadable eBook, How to Get 25,000 Visitors Per Month after subscribing. I may have lost that email. Would it be possible for you to post the download link here please? I’d love to have a read of that e-book. Thanks in advance.
Additionally, there’s always the old-fashioned way to promote your resources: reach out to fellow entrepreneurs, bloggers, or even journalists and shoot them a personal email with your latest resource attached (hint: don’t make them opt-in!).
While many marketers recognize the financial benefits of increasing targeted awareness, some direct marketing efforts using particular media have been criticized for generating poor quality leads, either due to poor message strategy or because of poorly compiled demographic databases. This poses a problem for marketers and consumers alike, as advertisers do not wish to waste money on communicating with consumers not interested in their products.
– Decide how often you will send your updates (daily, weekly or monthly) and stick to your schedule. Consistency is beneficial to both parts. Your subscribers will know when to expect the next email from you. And you will be building your positive reputation with ISPs by sending your campaigns at a regular basis.
It describes what your site is about. A good feature box provides a 10-second pitch of what your site is about. This means visitors won’t have to review your website’s navigation or even your content to decide if your blog is right for them.
Well, for starters, direct marketing allows you to very easily measure the success of a campaign. For example, say I send 1000 people an email marketing a new product, and as a result 10 people from this group buy.
According to this study conducted by the Nielsen Group, people scan emails very quickly (51 seconds), and the only areas they give any appreciable amount of time to at all are the initial copy and headlines.
You can create a list of the emails in a spreadsheet with each email in a different cell of the spreadsheet. When you want to email them, just open the spreadsheet and copy the entire row of email addresses. Then, go to your Gmail and paste them into the “To” field. This will put all the email addresses into your outgoing email without creating them as contacts.
They say that hindsight is 20/20, but I gladly would have paid the $5 I saved on my total purchase to NOT receive those emails over the years. Because with every one I got – and promptly deleted – you better believe that I was cursing their company name. It did nothing but hurt their company’s reputation and leave a bad taste in my mouth.
According to HubSpot, every year 25% data decays from business email databases. So compiling data from authentic sources once, can not keep the databases ready-to-use in a long run. So we keep updating our b2b email lists every quarter. So whenever marketers purchase email addresses from us, they get 100% up-to-date data.
Many people use throwaway email addresses when pressured into giving their info. This is especially true for the methods that list sellers use to collect email addresses. When you buy an email list, you’re really buying a large amount of defunct and unused email addresses.
With contact groups, you can easily organize your contacts making it easier to email a specific set of people. For example, if you created a contact group called “Soccer club,” you could just send a message to that group, rather than sending out an email to 50 different people. Never leave somebody off an email again. To create a contact group: Click Gmail at the top-left corner of your Gmail page, then choose Contacts. Select contacts that you want to add to a group, click the Groups button, then create new. Enter the name of the group. Click OK.
However, there is some juice when you buy emails list. If you buy 100,000emails and 85,000 happens to bounce it means you have a conversion rate of 15%. This is quite significant and why should I not buy if 15,000 are going to be good? How long does it take to have 15,000 people subscribe to ones list? If one is able to maintain and convert this 15,000 to become part of a sign up list, then can we not see that buying email lists could be a gold mine?
All of the things I have gone through in this post are great ideas and experiences I have made, and I know for sure that they will help you to effectively grow your email list and keep your email marketing budget intact.
As a business you should maximize any investments you make, including the investment in email marketing. Purchasing a list is a waste of money, damages your sender reputation and lowers the value of any legitimate email sending you may do. Seriously, it’s not worth it!

Much like Hubspot, Social Media Examiner is really good at giving things away. Their homepage has a huge call-to-action to sign up for a free ebook. When you’re scrolling down an individual blog post, you see another CTA—a popup offering instant access to a free video. With events and webinars and many different forms of media, Social Media Examiner has lots of opportunity to appeal to subscribers in many different ways.
Segmentation is what makes customers feel like you care about them—not about their money (which in turn makes them like you and want to spend their money with you!). In fact, according to MarketingSherpa, click-through rates on segmented emails can be as much as double the rate for unsegmented emails.
Send useful information and tips. Your emails should contain something that the customer wants. It shouldn’t be just the information about your company or yourself. Focus on giving more than just what you sell. Specific content, messages, and other targeted information that interests your customers are good to include. It is a great way to make readers look forward to your emails as they will know that they are going to receive great information from you. Provide value in your emails and don’t try to profit in some way from everyone of them.
Attaching something valuable to your email signup form is a surefire way to pique interest. Basically, give something away for free, for the price of an email address (which we all know is worth way more than free to the site that gets it). Here are a few suggestions.
And sure, when you compare a nickel for a thousand emails to, say, a hundred bucks  for a thousand emails (which is TWO THOUSAND TIMES the cost), it’s easy to further calculate that even if the response rate is only 1/2000th as good, you’re still coming out ahead.
How can you implement ways for people to give you their emails once they’re on your site? Independent of which tool you choose, out of the many available tools, you should know how to use them in the right way… to provide an amazing experience while asking visitors for their emails. 
The above screengrab is from an article on James Clear’s site. Before you get to any words in the article itself, you’ve been hit with three CTAs for his newsletter. Clearly, email is a priority for him!
Brian. You talk about how all these variables matter in getting this article to rank #1 for “list building” and how competitors have way more links than you, but then you also consider your DA and your PA together, you have almost the highest score out of the top 10 rankings; and when you consider you are more topical authority, then that explains why Hugpages (all purpose site) is not ranking higher. Maybe its not all as complicated as you suggest.
That said, there are still some benefits to more traditional approaches to direct marketing, for example, a 2009 study by Bangor University cited that direct marketing / physical material was more real to the brain, created stronger brand emotions, and led to a greater internalization of the ad. As a result, it may produce better response rates with certain groups – especially older ones.
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