Additionally, sending unsolicited emails is against the CAN-SPAM act. According to the CAN-SPAM Act, a U.S. law that regulates commercial emails, you cannot sell or transfer email addresses, even in the form of a mailing list.  Sending emails to people who didn’t ask for them is spam, and will make the readers will lose trust in your company.
Regrettably, the world of email marketing lists can be a very confusing place. On the one side, you have the legitimate, super-pristine — but usually somewhat expensive — opt-in email list brokers. And the key word here is “legitimate,” for these brokers offer genuine opt-in email addresses.
Not only have you not got accurate, up to date email lists and a strategy to reach out to them, you’ve got yourself a predictable outbound lead generation process. This strategy takes no time at all to set up and allows for truly scalable growth. Goodbye list buying.
One service that has been really liked by the crowd is that of a company called Database of Decision Makers. It offers you a never before heard offer of replacing the bad contacts with good ones, in case you come across any. They have established a good network of lead grabbers and can offer you a healthy database of the most recent contacts, new and freshly updated.
Thanks Rob. Single opt-in is definitely something to consider. I’m personally a fan of double optin because (as you said) you get less bad emails. But it’s a decision that depends on the person and business 🙂
According to recent research examining brain activation, few things light us up quite like seeing our names in print or on the screen. Our names are intrinsically tied to our self-perception and make up a massive part of our identity.
Really good article. When you start out it’s definitely tempting to buy an email list, but I’m glad that I didn’t do it with my business. I hate when I receive an unsolicited email from a company that I’m not familiar with. I imagine that most people probably feel the same way.
That’s not to say that I endorse this as a business practice. I don’t. BUT, it does show that relevance may trump permission when it comes to email marketing. And it’s pretty darn hard to buy a list outright and be anything close to relevant to all of the recipients.
Good information on this article. I am struggling with this myself. My company doesn’t want to risk its reputation, and there is too much conflicting information out there. I like Simon’s idea of comparing the list to social media – you can find just about everyone on there.
The fact is, email clients like Gmail, Yahoo and Hotmail don’t consider purchased lists or lists given to you by a third party to be opt-in, at all. They call it unsolicited bulk/commercial email. If the people you’re emailing did not directly sign up with you (and only you!) then it’s considered unsolicited.
If you own an ecommerce store, you have most definitely tried having products in your shop that are out of stock. It’s never a good thing, is it? Retailers lose an estimated $93 billion in annual sales because of out of stock inventory.
Instead of just linking to your home page, try linking to a relevant landing page within your author bio. Conversion rates are generally high because anyone clicking on your link wants more information from you.
Business-to-business lists will run even higher, usually starting at $250 CPM and running as high as $1,000 CPM for a very well targeted list. And yes, $1,000 CPM means that you’re paying a DOLLAR for each email address, and remember, that’s for a ONE-TIME use.
Wait a second. Most people who visit my site do not care about these links. They are here to learn about business. So we changed it to specific content pages that I know people who read my site would be interest in.
Promote content on your Facebook Timeline that your followers can sign up to access. Be sure to add social sharing buttons to the landing pages and thank-you pages you send them to so you encourage your leads to share those offers with their own networks.
Email marketing is a high-impact, low-cost way of delivering your marketing message to current customers and prospects — if, that is, you have a great email list. If you don’t, this article is for you. Read on for the most effective and creative ways to build your email list.
I love the fact that my mass emails can be highly personalized and still look like regular emails, vs. emails from Constant Contact etc. I can also go into the HTML code and tweak things if they are not right. We use Amazon Web Service SES which is very affordable. A great product for those who have reasonable computer skills to set everything up.
If you find a source of prospects from a targeted website and purchase an email list … you pretty much know they are visiting the website for certain reasons but I suppose this list could be useless too
Social media platforms are still in the very early stages of rolling out methods for businesses to capture email addresses. In other words, using social media is far from being a proven method to build your list. However, new platforms are usually full opportunities for new movers, so these resources might help you venture into new waters. 
Personalization Since it will be important in some cases to gather a subscriber’s name from a sign-up form, you’d be wise to test to see if this has a significant impact on open-rates & click-throughs. In some instances seeing a name in the subject line (or intro) will do wonders; in others it may confuse people into thinking your message is spam.
I didn’t purchase a list, but am given access on a monthly basis to new people who want to hear from suppliers. In this case, the company that provides me with the details is a wedding directory where brides are looking for people to get in touch with them.

Now, take it the next step further. What happens when that person starts to get bombarded with promotional email that is simply not wanted? Either he will tune out any message that is from someone he doesn’t know, or he will simply abandon the email address and start a new email account elsewhere.
Did you know that there are organizations dedicated to combating email spam? Thank goodness, right? They set up a little thing called a honeypot, which is a planted email address that, when harvested and emailed, identifies the sender as a spammer. Similarly, things called spam traps can be created to identify spammy activity; they are set up when an email address yields a hard bounce because it is old or no longer valid, but still receives consistent traffic. Fishy, eh? As a result, the email address turns into a spam trap that stops returning the hard bounce notice, and instead accepts the message and reports the sender as a spammer.
They give the sense of urgency and VIP-status. If you sign up for their newsletter, you’ll be the first one to know about new sales, when they get new products in store, and you’ll even get exclusive previews before everyone else.
“You may use the email address from your blog to send marketing emails, subject to the rules of CAN SPAM in any other situation. But be aware that the focus of any CAN SPAM compliance analysis starts at whether the ‘primary purpose’ of the message is commercial content.
At the other end of the spectrum, you have what I call the real “fly-by-nighters.” These are the people who purport to have 100 million or 200 million “opt in” email addresses, and they’ll send out crazy amounts of email for you (like 10 million emails) for a ridiculously small amount of money (like $500).
They have expertise in custom business lists for any industry vertical. The files that they provide comes with complete contact information including business name, contact name, contact title, telephone number, confirmed email address and fax number.
Don’t read everything at once. There is a lot of great information in here, but it’s easy to feel overwhelmed after reading through all of the content in one sitting. Instead, take incremental steps. For example, if you want to find out where or how to ask people for their emails on your site, read the content in chapter 2, then implement it; come back later for the next steps.
This is all starting to sound like a bad idea, isn’t it? You’ll spend all that time and money, and when all is said and done, very few of your emails will actually be delivered, let alone opened and acted upon.
If you don’t already blog, you should! Blog posts help you increase your ranking on search engines like Google, and allow you collect blog subscribers that you can then upgrade to more actionable email campaigns over time.
Adding fuel to the fire is the fact that there were MANY email addresses in the list that started with admin@, advertise@, customerservice@, and webmaster@. These “role-based” email addresses may be valid, but they are certainly not opted in. In fact, there were 284 email addresses that started with “info@,” which is a clear giveaway that this is not an opt-in list.
As a business you should maximize any investments you make, including the investment in email marketing. Purchasing a list is a waste of money, damages your sender reputation and lowers the value of any legitimate email sending you may do. Seriously, it’s not worth it!
Broadcast faxing, in which faxes are sent to multiple recipients, is now less common than in the past.[citation needed] This is partly due to laws in the United States and elsewhere which regulate its use for consumer marketing. In 2005, President Bush signed into law S.714, the Junk Fax Prevention Act of 2005 (JFPA), which allows marketers to send commercial faxes to those with whom they have an established business relationship (EBR), but imposes some new requirements. These requirements include providing an opt-out notice on the first page of faxes and establishing a system to accept opt-outs at any time of the day. Roughly 2% of direct marketers use fax, mostly for business-to-business marketing campaigns.[17]
In the checkout process at Greenline, they ask for all the “normal” things you usually ask for in a checkout process: Are you a private person, business, or public institution? And then they ask for email address, phone number, name, address, and zip code.
With the expansion of digital technology and tools, direct marketing is increasingly taking place through online channels. Most online advertising is delivered to a focused group of customers and has a trackable response.
It’s tempting to think of short-term ROI, but Return Path reports just one spam trap address can decrease your inbox placement rates to 81% and lower. It’s hard to increase business growth if your emails can’t reach your subscribers.
Downloadable resources can be an incredible source of new email leads. They also provide prospects with useful information that helps them get more use out of your product—so they’re a win all-around.
If your goal is to own and market to a legitimate opt-in email list (that is, the kind of email list that has a shot at garnering response), then buying an email list is not for you. The reason for that is simple…you really can’t “buy” someone’s permission. They have to give it to you.
This is honestly one of the best articles I’ve read all year on increasing opt-in rates. And my attention span these days is quite brief. With such a busy schedule, I don’t have time to read junk. Thanks for the great tips!
And let me tell you, mixed in with those email addresses were a huge number of foreign email addresses. I’m no geography major, but I don’t think Russia is in any part of the southeastern United States.
People give their consent to get your mailings. Your website visitors are your potential recipients. They come to your site, and they like it, and they want to get more information about your products, services, or any other information you can provide.